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COVID-19 Assistance for Your Team With MaxOne

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Other, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

COVID-19 Assistance for your Team with MaxOne

COVID-19 has taken everybody by surprise. With schools closed across much of the United States, practice for spring sports have been cancelled and offseason regimens for all sports have been put on hold. This pandemic has left nearly 36 million youth athletes and their coaches stunned, and unsure of what to do and how to move forward.

While this may spell trouble for many programs, those coaches and teams who are using the MaxOne Team App for coaching, training, and team management can coach their entire team while students are social-distancing at home.

MaxOne’s Team App is being used by hundreds of high schools and colleges across the U.S. to stay connected in a time of limited face-to-face interaction. To date, MaxOne has helped more than 20,000 coaches and 200,000 athletes improve performance ranging from 12-40%, by creating virtual on-demand training environments.

How to keep your athletes active during COVID-19

As classrooms and meetings are turning virtual, it’s still important for coaches to stay connected and keep their athletes moving forward. MaxOne has always been concerned with improving youth sports around the nation and times like this require an all hands on deck approach that shouldn’t be taken lightly. 

During this time of uncertainty, MaxOne is here to help give coaches the tools necessary to keep their teams moving in a positive direction. MaxOne is being used by hundreds of high schools and colleges across the U.S. to stay connected in a time of limited face-to-face interaction.

“We’ve spent the last year developing our athletes and working towards a goal. The last thing I would want to see is that progress and momentum lost. The ability to customize at-home workouts for our athletes while they are away from the weight room is extremely helpful,” says Riki Valdez, football coach at Sahuarita High School in Arizona.

In an effort to help athletes and coaches, we are providing our training and communication platform for free to any school or club through the end of May. Sign-up by clicking here.

Communicating with your team and their parents

In addition to MaxOne being a resource for keeping your team physically active, it’s also a great way for your whole program to stay connected. SMS, chat, and email are all available with MaxOne, allowing coaches to get updates and messages out to everyone with ease. 

“With the upcoming push towards limited face-to-face interaction, it’s important to our program to continue building a strong foundation for communication. Messaging and chat features paired with customizable content sharing gives our coaching staff confidence that we will continue to move our program forward in this new reality that we are facing,” continues Coach Valdez. 

It’s important that we get through this together, and take the necessary steps to weather the storm in its current state. Relationships still need to be built and the new reality of the “virtual locker room” shouldn’t change that. 

“With the current state of uncertainty, the MaxOne software is going to really help our coaching staff keep the relationship we have with our athletes going even if we aren’t able to be with them in person. Not to mention the ability it has to keep our parents in the loop as well so they can keep track of all the changes that are occurring.” says 

Keith Kilmer, football coach at Lowell High School in Indiana

Change is here, and whether you are ready for it or not, the MaxOne app is a great place to help you get started. 

Need more assistance? We are here to help.

Here at MaxOne, we are doing our part to help stop the spread of COVID-19. We’ve closed our headquarters in Grand Rapids, Michigan for the near future, but are operating at full capacity as a remote team. If you need assistance, our customers come first so you can count on MaxOne to be there for you. 

[In case you missed it]  Sign-up here to access your free MaxOne account through the end of May.

Want to learn more about MaxOne? Check out our website HERE

Building a Culture of Trust

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

This article was originally written by Wes Simmons from @3DCoaches and it can originally be found on 3Dinstitute.com, a website dedicated to providing a framework for coaching built on a foundation of purpose and delivered through workshops and online learning. In this article, Wes discusses building trust within your program.


Building a Culture of Trust

Building a culture of trust is imperative if we want our teams to reach their fullest potential. Excellence doesn’t happen by accident. Any sustainable success we achieve is directly related to the processes we conceive. Good processes are what drive good results, so we need to help athletes learn to TRUST the process.

To build extraordinary teams, our team members must learn to TRUST in extraordinary ways.

To establish a culture of trust, it’s helpful to think about how trust needs to work for an athlete in 3 directions: upward, inward and outward.

Upward

First, athletes must trust US as their coaches (upward). As those in authority over our teams, we should regularly look in the mirror and ask ourselves questions like, “Do MY attitudes and actions breed trust or do they undermine it?”

As leaders, it’s essential that our words and actions line up. As athletes learn to trust us, they will become much more likely to trust the PROCESSES that we lay out for their development as individuals and as teams.

Inward

If our processes are right, and athletes buy into them because of their trust in us, their confidence will be on the rise. With hard work, repetition, and patience, our athletes will begin to trust in their OWN ABILITIES at a new level as well.

In other words, their trust will not only be UPWARD toward you as a coach but INWARD toward themselves. This is an essential character quality that will empower them to not only face adversity in pressurized sport situations but in the pressurized situations of life. If we can establish this type of confidence in our athletes, we set them up for success on and off the field.

Outward

Athletes need to trust UPWARD in you as the coach. They also need to trust INWARD in their own developed skill-set. Finally, they need to trust OUTWARD toward their teammates.

When you have a team full of individuals who trust that everyone else on the team will do THEIR job, great things begin to happen. And when it works in all 3 directions, UPWARD, INWARD, and OUTWARD, our culture begins to permeate with trust.

Where To Start

One of the best ways to GAIN trust is to GIVE trust. When we show our athletes that we trust them, that trust will begin to be reciprocated.

Remember, it starts with US. First and foremost, we need to demonstrate ourselves as being worthy to be trusted. One of the best ways to GAIN trust is to GIVE trust. When we show our athletes that we trust them, that trust will begin to be reciprocated. Here’s a short clip from a 3D Coaching Workshop where I was sharing along these lines:

When we’re intentional about giving more trust to our athletes, it should cause us to think carefully about the role of rules on our teams. Team rules are important, but we must always be willing to (re)evaluate our team rules in the light of relationships. Besides protecting people from various forms of harm, I believe rules should mostly exist to protect relationships.

If we want to build a culture of trust, we need relationships to flourish in every direction.

If this is our desire, as Joe Ehrmann has convincingly demonstrated, we really only need to enact 2 primary team rules:

  1. Coaches love your athletes
  2. Athletes love each other

If these rules define the boundaries for our programs, relationships will thrive, trust will skyrocket, and we will be well on our way to creating great team cohesion.

Read Original Article

Connect with Wes Simmons on Twitter 

Coach, You Make the Difference: Coaching Yourself First

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Uncategorized, Volleyball, Wrestling

This article was written by Mark Maguire who is the President of Castle Hill Knights Baseball Club. The article was posted on CoachUp, a great resource for finding a coach for personalized training. This article gives insight on how coaches can improve their mentality to better themselves and their program.

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Coaching Yourself First

Everyone loves to win. Though some can deal with losses better than others, I think it’s fair to say the obvious—nobody loves to lose. I have never seen a team of athletes, whether young or old (coaches and parents included), NOT jump for joy and celebrate with gusto from winning a game after a long stretch of losing. Winning tastes better after losing.

Coaches have a default system built nicely into their DNA—and that is to win.

No, coach, you’re not a bad person for wanting to win; you’re not a bad person for wanting all the right ingredients given to you to help you win; you’re not a bad person to even expect the support from your club so you can lead your team to win. And you know what would make winning even better—if all the players and parents who are involved in your team like you and said awesome things about you. Everyone would sleep well and there wouldn’t be any issues to deal with. Yes, winning… and when everyone’s a winner… that can’t help but taste good.

But let’s get back to the default system built into you that wants to win and to tackle a season that you already perceive will be full of downsides, frustration and losses. (If you’re an awesome coach with an awesome team with an awesome plan, you maybe wasting your time reading any further).

There is something you probably already know and probably don’t need reminding but I’m going to say it anyway: don’t focus on winning.

Winning is a result, an outcome. It’s similar to the fact that when you focus on wanting to be loved and you try everything in your power for others to love you, the outcome is the person or group you want to love you, is turned off by you.

In every aspect of life we all must let go of the outcomes; they are too far away and hinder us from working on the one thing we have control over—ourselves.

Coaching Yourself First

Whatever group of athletes you’re working with this season, you’re teaching individuals techniques and skills to add to their repertoire so they’ll not only be better players but they’ll also contribute to the team better.  You’re working on the here and now and what is in front of you. The outcome will take care of itself. And if the weekly outcome of the individual or the team is not what you hoped for, then you evaluate what has happened and keep working on the skills, techniques or even the respect for the game that you’re aiming for.

Coach, you make the difference.

But now, here is the big thing, and I hope you are sitting down and not going to skim through this paragraph.

The first and foremost person you’re coaching and are responsible for is YOU.

I see it all the time when coaches (also parents and players) are complaining about what’s wrong, blaming others for their frustrations, and making excuses for why their situation is dire.

Coach, if you want to have any chance, you must STOP all these negative behaviours. These only reveal your own insecurities and fears about the outcomes of your team and yourself. You have lost focus on your own personal growth and what you’re learning and correcting about yourself.

I’ll say it again, the one and only thing you can control is yourself: your reactions, your mindset, your attitude!

If you’re prone to complaining, excuse making or blaming others, it doesn’t create a good mix if you’re prone to wanting to win. Unfortunately, very few make the effort to show self-control to stop these traits.

There is no fancy formula here to speaking and acting differently. Self control is the key. Start with stopping  to think about what you’re about to say. If a complaint, excuse, or a finger-pointing blame is about to slip out of your mouth—STOP! Say nothing. Only say something if it is constructive, or encouraging, or helpful.

Breathe deeply and refocus on how you need to act or react to your current situation.

The default for any coach who is having a tough time (real or imaginary) is to try anything and possibly sacrifice anything to muster up a win.

Don’t, however, sacrifice the overall good you want to create by teaching higher values of the game and having higher expectations of your young athletes. Eventually, you will be known to have made a positive difference and that difference will last a lifetime for those fine human beings entrusted in your care.

Coach, you make the difference!

 

The Process of Leadership

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

 

 

This article was originally posted  by Dr. Cory Dobbs, on Football Toolbox. Dobbs is a national expert on sport leadership and team building and is the founder of The Academy for Sport Leadership.  A teacher, speaker, consultant, and writer, Dr. Dobbs has worked with professional, collegiate, and high school athletes and coaches teaching leadership as a part of the sports experience. In this article he talks about the two distinct difference between two dominant leadership styles, drivers and builders. 

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Drivers Vs. Builders

We often talk about a leader having a “style” of leadership, a distinctive way of thinking, feeling, and acting.  And it is true; coaches do have a style that shapes who they are and what they do.  The relationship between style and leadership is expressed as a systematic process in how a coach gets things done and inspires his or her players to be their very best.

Over the past decade I have watched many coaches in action and have detected a distinct difference between two dominant leadership styles.  There are many ways to describe the leadership habits of coaches, but it appears to me that as leaders most fall into one of two categories—drivers or builders.   Drivers tend to be what leadership experts refer to as transactional leaders while builders fall pretty naturally into the category of transformational leaders. Drivers and builders have two very different leadership mindsets and skill sets.

Drivers are generally after impressive achievements, especially the attainment of fame, status, popularity, or power.  Not that there is anything wrong with that, as Jerry Seinfeld would say.  Drivers view success to be mastery of the technical and tactical aspects of their sport. Builders commit to their calling and enjoy the human development side of coaching.  For them, significance is found in contributing to the lives of their players.  It’s not that they don’t want to win; it’s simply that winning includes building self-confident people who will succeed away from the playing field.

Coaching is a major factor in any team’s success.  Most players recognize this.  They’ve been coached since they were tots playing in youth leagues.  And for the most part they’ve believed in and trusted their coaches to teach them to play the game while instilling life skills and personal values.  However, many adults reveal years later that they learned little from coaches they encountered in their student-athletic experience.  Generally, the coaches that fail to have a long-term impact on student-athletes are transactional leaders.  Many former student-athletes view their experience as being a pawn in the game of student-athletics.

Transformational leaders (builders) do more with and for their student-athletes than transactional leaders (drivers).  These leaders tend to empower student-athletes with challenge and persuasion and actively engage in supporting and mentoring the holistic development of their players.  Transformational leaders seek to inspire their followers to commit to a shared vision of how student-athletics can enhance their lives.  For the transformational leader the sport situation offers an opportunity for the participant to learn such life skills as perseverance, character development, relationship building, and goal attainment.

Transactional leaders, on the other hand, are those that prefer to set up simple interactional exchanges or agreements with their followers, often investing little in building relationships.  They manage players through the use of carrots and sticks—offering a reward (usually playing time) for a desired behavior.  These leaders are those that often use the maxim “the bench is my best teacher.”

This is a prime example of contingent reinforcement—you do “X” and I’ll give you “Y.”  A transformational leader, while certainly not shy to use the bench as a learning tool, would not view the bench as a teacher—that’s a role they cherish.  The transactional coach keeps his or her distance from the athlete, preferring to have a “distant” relationship.  Some coaches will fake the relational process, but the lack of authenticity is quickly recognized by the student-athlete.  The transformational coach is more likely to spend time building relationships with players and showing them he or she cares.  Their mindset is that people aren’t going to care about you and your concerns unless they know you care about theirs.

Transformational leaders don’t do this just to be nice, they understand it to be an effective and appropriate way to deal with young and developing student-athletes.  Building relations is not a road block to success as many coaches find that because they show they care about the person, they can ask for and demand more performance.  Think about it.  Are you more likely to extend yourself for someone you care about or someone you don’t like and care for?

Coaches do many things.  They inspire and motivate, they teach and instruct, and they set an example.  More than anything else, however, coaches help the student-athletes make sense of some of life’s most important lessons.

Over time many coaches move from a driver dominated way of coaching to that of a builder.  Take for example Westmont College men’s basketball coach John Moore.  “Coaching and teaching is more meaningful for me today than it was eight to ten years ago,” said Moore.  “It is more significant because of the kinds of things that are important in coaching.  Someone once said to me, ‘You don’t have a philosophy of coaching until you get to 15 years as a head coach.’ I discounted that originally, but there was a point for me, and it was in that 15-year range, that I realized that I had a philosophy of coaching – that makes it more meaningful for me and more meaningful for my players.”

Being a driver, a transactional leader, can be very effective in producing immediate results.  However, the constant pounding and intimidating of your student-athletes will reduce the motivation of most student-athletes.  Student-athletes prefer to be guided and seek motivation from the collaborative process of coaching.  Even the most self-motivated player will lose their drive if you don’t provide them with positive reinforcement and a sense of worth.

Transformational coaches appeal to players by working with the athletes to create a compelling and collective purpose; a purpose beyond individual ambition that enriches the possibilities of each team member.  By valuing both relationships and results, a builder’s influence leads to higher levels of trust, empowerment, and community.

For builders, the real definition of success is a life and work that brings personal fulfillment, lasting relationships, and makes a difference in the world in which they live.

Are You a Driver or a Builder?

Drivers  / Dominant Leadership Style: TransactionalBuilders / Dominant Leadership Style: Transformative
  • Put results first. Relationships are subordinate to results, a means to an end.
  • Put people first.  Relationships are priorities to producing results.
  • Make the decisions. Drivers like being decisive and in control.  Drivers set the agenda.
  • Stress team capabilities.  Builders want to build systems and talent.
  • Possess a controlling spirit.  They feel if they can control people, they’ll maintain absolute authority.
  • Get others involved.  Builders seek input from other coaches and value input from players.
  • Resort to more regulations.  Drivers use rules and regulations to enforce compliance.  Drivers want things done their way.
  • Let solutions emerge.  Builders don’t try to tackle every problem knowing that some problems solve themselves.
  • Crack the whip.  Drivers keep pressure on for accountability.  Come down hard when goals aren’t attained.
  • Take a long-term focus.  Builders assemble players, programs, and processes.
  • Take a short-term focus.  Drivers tend to focus on the day’s or week’s results.
  • Are mission driven. It’s the mission that sets the priorities.
  • Focus on “what” have you done for me lately? Enough said.
  • Are servant leaders. What’s my contribution?  Builders possess a mental model stimulated by a “What can I contribute to the lives of my players” approach to leading.
  • Get “in your face.”  Drivers thrive on confrontation.  “My way or the highway”.
  • Embrace empowerment. Builders work to prepare others for leadership roles.
  • Are more critical than positive.  Drivers find it difficult to accentuate the positive.
  • Support identity of team. No two teams will ever be the same.  Builders see value in the diversity of personalities.
  • Power trip.  Fear giving away power.  Empowering student-athletes to become team leaders is not a priority.
  • Vision is the main course, not an appetizer.  Builders weigh the costs of today’s decisions on  tomorrow.
  • Span of vision.  Concern is for results today regardless of costs tomorrow.

 

About the Author

Dr. Cory Dobbs is a national expert on sport leadership and team building and is the founder of The Academy for Sport Leadership.  A teacher, speaker, consultant, and writer, Dr. Dobbs has worked with professional, collegiate, and high school athletes and coaches teaching leadership as a part of the sports experience.  He facilitates workshops, seminars, and consults with a wide-range of professional organizations and teams.  Dr. Dobbs previously taught in the graduate colleges of business and education at Northern Arizona University, Sport Management and Leadership at Ohio University, and the Jerry Colangelo College of Sports Business at Grand Canyon University.

Link to original article: The Process of Leadership

4 Keys to Developing Mental Toughness

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

 

4 Keys to Developing Mental Toughness” by Tony Miller, was originally posted by our partners at FastModel Sports. This article highlights 4 simple yet effective tips that every coach can use to improve their athlete’s, and their own mental toughness.

 

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4 Keys to Developing Mental Toughness

 

The late John Wooden once said, “You can’t have confidence unless you are prepared.” Much of players’ lack of mental toughness (i.e., lack of focus, confidence, control under pressure) is simply due to a lack of preparation.

As a coach, it’s now clear to me why Coach Wooden spent the first 10 minutes of the first practice teaching his players how to put on their socks. It was a lesson in the attention to details. Attention to details results in proper preparation. Preparation produces focus and confidence. Focus and confidence produce mental toughness. Mental toughness produces a winning mindset, and so on.

And now you’re probably wondering, “So how exactly do I develop mental toughness in my players?” Let me offer several suggestions:

 

  1. Teach, over and over and… Do your players understand what habits are essential for success? Have you communicated those habits to them? As a teacher, I’ve realized my students don’t get most of what I say in my first explanation. Why should I expect my players to be any different? Teach, then repeat, repeat, repeat.

 

  1. Help players focus on the process of improvement rather than on the outcome. Win or lose, players must 1) learn from both failures AND successes and 2) exhibit an unwavering level of effort and intensity. In order for this to occur, we as coaches must point out the positives and improvements seen in players’ performances. In addition, we must demand excellence and maintain high expectations for players. As for the effort and intensity…

 

  1. Constantly emphasize appropriate “attitude and effort.” We encourage our players to focus on what we can control. Opponents’ abilities, officials, and other outside forces – those things are out of our control. Focus on what we can control: our attitude and effort.

 

  1. Develop a motivational climate that fosters mental toughness. This is accomplished by creating an environment in which task mastery, self-improvement, effort, and dedication are encouraged and rewarded.

 

 

M1 Announces Long-Term Strategic
Partnership with Anthony Tolliver

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

                                                                                               


                                                                                                                                                                 Detroit, September 22

Tolliver and MaxOne a Perfect Fit 

NBA veteran Anthony Tolliver is known league wide as the ultimate team player. With that said, it should come as no surprise that the ultimate team player, Tolliver, has teamed up with the ultimate team platform, MaxOne for a long-term partnership.

 

 

MaxOne and Detroit Forward Anthony Tolliver are extremely excited to announce a partnership focused on growing the game of basketball and providing motivated athletes and coaches access to NBA quality workouts and training.

I have always had a passion for helping players develop both on and off the court. MaxOne shares that passion and is a phenomenal platform designed to build stronger teams. I’m extremely excited about what we can do together to grow the game of basketball

A leader and influencer amongst his peers, Tolliver was elected as Vice President of the NBA Players Association. More than a strong leader on the court and in the locker room, Tolliver also prides himself on his business acumen and has brought his high energy approach to other partnerships that have matched his interests and values.

Upon hearing about MaxOne, Tolliver wanted to try it for himself.  After using the skill and strength features of the MaxOne app Tolliver immediately became a believer.

I wish I would have had a tool like this coming up.  It makes training so simple and allows me to track the work that I’m putting in.  MaxOne should be used from the lowest levels to the highest.  I plan to use MaxOne with my trainers and find ways to help young athletes improve their games.

Stay tuned for new and exciting initiatives from MaxOne and Anthony Tolliver.

13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

 

This article was written by Amy Morin as a preview of her book: “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do”. This article isn’t sports specific, but discusses principles that can be applied to anyone’s sports program.


 

 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do

Mentally strong people have healthy habits. They manage their emotions, thoughts, and behaviors in ways that set them up for success in life. Check out these things that mentally strong people don’t do so that you too can become more mentally strong.

1. They Don’t Waste Time Feeling Sorry for Themselves

Mentally strong people don’t sit around feeling sorry about their circumstances or how others have treated them. Instead, they take responsibility for their role in life and understand that life isn’t always easy or fair.

2. They Don’t Give Away Their Power

They don’t allow others to control them, and they don’t give someone else power over them. They don’t say things like, “My boss makes me feel bad,” because they understand that they are in control over their own emotions and they have a choice in how they respond.

3. They Don’t Shy Away from Change

Mentally strong people don’t try to avoid change. Instead, they welcome positive change and are willing to be flexible. They understand that change is inevitable and believe in their abilities to adapt.

4. They Don’t Waste Energy on Things They Can’t Control

You won’t hear a mentally strong person complaining over lost luggage or traffic jams. Instead, they focus on what they can control in their lives. They recognize that sometimes, the only thing they can control is their attitude.

5. They Don’t Worry About Pleasing Everyone

Mentally strong people recognize that they don’t need to please everyone all the time. They’re not afraid to say no or speak up when necessary. They strive to be kind and fair, but can handle other people being upset if they didn’t make them happy.

6. They Don’t Fear Taking Calculated Risks

They don’t take reckless or foolish risks, but don’t mind taking calculated risks. Mentally strong people spend time weighing the risks and benefits before making a big decision, and they’re fully informed of the potential downsides before they take action.

7. They Don’t Dwell on the Past

Mentally strong people don’t waste time dwelling on the past and wishing things could be different. They acknowledge their past and can say what they’ve learned from it. However, they don’t constantly relive bad experiences or fantasize about the glory days. Instead, they live for the present and plan for the future.

8. They Don’t Make the Same Mistakes Over and Over

They accept responsibility for their behavior and learn from their past mistakes. As a result, they don’t keep repeating those mistakes over and over. Instead, they move on and make better decisions in the future.

9. They Don’t Resent Other People’s Success

Mentally strong people can appreciate and celebrate other people’s success in life. They don’t grow jealous or feel cheated when others surpass them. Instead, they recognize that success comes with hard work, and they are willing to work hard for their own chance at success.

10. They Don’t Give Up After the First Failure

They don’t view failure as a reason to give up. Instead, they use failure as an opportunity to grow and improve. They are willing to keep trying until they get it right.

11. They Don’t Fear Alone Time

Mentally strong people can tolerate being alone and they don’t fear silence. They aren’t afraid to be alone with their thoughts and they can use downtime to be productive. They enjoy their own company and aren’t dependent on others for companionship and entertainment all the time but instead can be happy alone.

12. They Don’t Feel the World Owes Them Anything

They don’t feel entitled to things in life. They weren’t born with a mentality that others would take care of them or that the world must give them something. Instead, they look for opportunities based on their own merits.

13. They Don’t Expect Immediate Results

Whether they are working on improving their health or getting a new business off the ground, mentally strong people don’t expect immediate results. Instead, they apply their skills and time to the best of their ability and understand that real change takes time.

The 5 Stages of a Coach’s Career

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Volleyball

The following post was written by Coach Dawn Redd-Kelly and originally published on her coaching blog, Coach Dawn Writes.


 

Let me tell you what I think about coaches: we’re crazy in our preparation and dedication, we work long hours and love it, we give up our nights and weekends, we mentor our student-athletes, we demand big things from them and even more from ourselves, we’re passionate in our belief in our team and our love for our sport, we believe in the power of sport to have a positive and long-lasting impact in our athlete’s lives.  So when I saw “The 5 Stages of Your Career” over at Bob Starkey’s blog, I wanted to expand on it over here.  It’s interesting to figure out what stage you’re in and those that you’ve already gone through…or have you circled back around to some you thought you were finished with?  Check them out and see what you think.

The 5 Stages of Your Career

1.   Survival: Don’t Know What You Don’t Know
Coaches, you remember what this stage felt like don’t you?   Or maybe you’re in the middle of this stage now and feel like you’re flailing.  I remember being beyond clueless…that’s back when I thought I just needed to know volleyball to be a volleyball coach!  Turns out also I needed to formulate a recruiting plan, balance a budget, create practice plans, order equipment, manage assistant coaches, and make in-game adjustments.  Color me unprepared, but thank goodness for a veteran coach who took me under his wing.

2.   Striving for Success: You Want Folks to Recognize You Can Coach
Your motivation?  Winning, plain and simple.  You’re obsessed with conquering the competition and put in hours and hours of your time to make it happen.  Being the best is what drives you and to be the best, you need the tangible accolades that go along with that:  lots of W’s in the win column, all-league awards for your team, and maybe a coach of the year for you.

3.   Satisfaction: You Relax, Set Another Goal, & Want To Get Better
Now that you’ve achieved a few of your goals, you can relax and know that you’re a good coach and you have the respect of your peers.  You attend conferences to network and visit with old friends as much as you do to learn some new things…you’re getting established.  Each year you set new goals to accomplish that will push you and your team forward…you’re focused.

4.   Significance: Changing Lives For The Good
At this stage you’re more concerned with how you impact your teams and your legacy than you are with personal glory…after all, you’ve already accomplished a lot.  Now you want to make sure your teams understand the value of sport and hope that you’re teaching them how to be better people, not just better players.  With all of your experience and years in the game, you’re very knowledgeable.  And because of the success you’ve had in your career, this is the stage where people solicit your opinion and ask for your help with their coaching conundrums.

5.   Spent: No Juice Left, Can’t Do It Any More
The busses, the trips, preseason, recruiting, the hustle, the grind…you’re over it.  You’re ready to hang with the family and actually make it home before nine o’clock at night.  And your weekends?  You want them back.  Not even the prospect of that super sweet and talented recruiting class that you just brought in is enough to bring you back into the fold.  As much as you love your sport, you’re just not that fired up about the season this year…it’s time to hang it up.

So what stage are YOU at?

A Leader in Every Locker – Coach’s Guidebook

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

A Leader in Every Locker is an interesting read.  It definitely challenges the status quo of having captains and letting them be the leaders of the team.  If nothing else – this will challenge you to think differently about how you “lead the leaders” on your team.  Check out more leadership tools that they offer at www.aleaderineverylocker.com.


 

Notice to the Reader

WARNING!   What you are about to read may:

  • Seem contrary to a lot of what you learned from your experience as a student-athlete.
  • Turn out to be at odds with the way most teams are run.
  • Challenge the basic premises of leadership; particularly that leaders possess “the right stuff.”
  • Be disturbing because it may raise issues with some of your deepest beliefs.

A Leader in Every Locker takes you beyond the out-dated team captain model of team leadership. After a decade of research and development, this book reveals a transformational leadership model that fuels the growth and development of all your student-athletes.

 

A LEADER IN EVERY LOCKER


The Academy for Sport Leadership has designed a practical curriculum and useful resources for transforming your team into a high-performing learning organization. We’ve integrated the 21st Century model of team leadership into our programs and processes. And we’ve designed resources to help you develop a leader in every locker!

Here’s the catch though: It takes more than simply appointing a couple of players to the role of team captain.  At the heart of the leader in every locker framework is the core belief that every student-athlete has the ability to learn and develop leadership skills.

After a decade of research and development I’ve identified eight essential roles that affect the internal dynamics of a team—high school or college. When these roles are filled and played well it makes it easy for team to be close together, helps the team build identity, and creates an environment in which trust, morale, and commitment freely emerge with players focusing more attention on one another through building of interdependent relationships.

 

8 Roles of Team Leadership

Dobbs’ 8 Roles of Team Leadership sets a foundation for building a peer-based leadership system. The following values and priorities are vital to constructing an infrastructure for effective team leadership.

  • Inclusiveness and participation
  • Influence
  • Initiative
  • Abundance-based mindset
  • Autonomy
  • Self-organizing
  • Community
  • Equitable

What others are saying…

I must admit my professional bias towards the model of “A Leader in Every Locker” that Dr. Dobbs describes in this, his latest book. I too am a proponent of a shared leadership model and believe that leadership is not a gift reserved for a small minority, but that it can be learned and enhanced in most people. It is our responsibility as coaches, educators, and leaders to raise up a future generation of leaders. After all, isn’t helping others in their leadership journey the ultimate testament to our own leadership capacity? With this book Dr. Dobbs gives a clear and convincing argument to the importance and need to adopt this 21st century model and a path as to how to transform your leadership environment from hit-or-miss to intentional.

-Juan Pablo Favero, Associate Head Coach Women’s Soccer, San Diego State

 

 

MaxOne Webinar (6/29/17)

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

M1 Marketplace Launch and Summer – Best Practices

This past month we held our first ever MaxOne webinar. We were really pumped about the engagement with our MaxOne coaches during this webinar. In this webinar we wanted to highlight some of the upgrades we’ve been working hard on this summer for our coaches.

Some of the topics covered: 

  • The Launch Of Our New M1 Marketplace – allowing coaches to download content directly to their MaxOne account, and deliver directly to their athletes and coaches.
  • Our Upgraded Leaderboard  allowing for best result and now cumulative leaderboard types for tracking activities like shot counter or miles ran, etc.
  • Summer – Best Practices  for streamlining admin and organization and further engaging athletes throughout the summer.

We wanted the share this webinar for those of you that didn’t get a chance to attend. We look forward to hosting more webinars, to give our coaches as much value as possible.