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Zach Phillips

CoachUp Turning 15,000+ Private Coaches Virtual Through Partnership with MaxOne

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Other, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

MaxOne on August, 31 2020

CoachUp and MaxOne

CoachUp, a web-based service that connects athletes with private coaches, has partnered with Virtual Coaching Platform (‘VCP’) provider MaxOne to launch the CoachUp 24-7 app. The new app features a white-labeled integration with MaxOne’s VCP, allowing CoachUp to provide significantly expanded virtual coaching capabilities and a streamlined business model to their user base of over 15,000 private coaches nationwide. Since its soft launch in July, the 5-star rated app is already being used by hundreds of coaches and significant growth is expected as fall sports programs begin.  

With support from prominent sports figures like Stephen Curry and industry giants like SportsEngine, TeamSnap, and UnderArmour, CoachUp has become the preferred service for athletes to find private coaches based on their location and criteria like price, training type, reviews, and sport category, including basketball, baseball, lacrosse, and soccer. 

By working with MaxOne, CoachUp is seeking to counteract disruptions to in-person training by offering significantly improved technology and industry-leading virtual training tools for coaches. “We’re thrilled to be working with a leading company like CoachUp that is changing the way coaching is done,” said MaxOne CEO Jason Mejuer. 

Through the CoachUp 24/7 app, coaches can set their pricing, invite athletes, build customized training programs, and provide feedback while monitoring progress and staying connected from anywhere. Mejeur described the enhanced subscription capabilities in the CoachUp 24/7 app as a “business-in-a-box solution for private coaches that gives them more control over the growth and management of their businesses.”

CoachUp COO, Alex Stone commented, “it would be far too costly and time-consuming for our coaches to build their own apps. Partnering with MaxOne gives us another offering for our coaching and training partners by equipping them with cutting edge tools to build their businesses and strengthen relationships with clients.”

This recent high-profile collaboration is the latest of 11 such partnerships so far in 2020 – a record year for MaxOne. When questioned on the increasing pace of integrations and partnerships, Mejeur said, “the feedback we’re getting is that companies choose us over competitors or building their own apps because of our leading technology and white labeling capabilities.”

Mejeur further emphasized that these relationships are successful because each company remains focused on its core competencies and key brand identity. “Technology should empower and enable these brands, not be a risky financial endeavor that distracts from the company’s mission and values.”

About CoachUp

CoachUp is a service that connects athletes with private coaches. We believe that private coaching is the secret to reaching the next level in sports + life.

With thousands of coaches across the country, and hundreds of training sessions happening every day, we are the nation’s leading private coaching company. We are also a team of athletes and coaches, including our founders, Jordan Fliegel (basketball) and Arian Radmand (sailing). And we are dedicated to our mission: help kids change the trajectory of their lives through sports.

About MaxOne

MaxOne’s Virtual Coaching Platform (‘VCP’) empowers organizations, trainers, coaches, and athletes with a digital solution to train, connect, and grow together, anywhere. With an increasing list of demands, directors and coaches need to be smarter in the development of their training programs and in the use of their time and resources. MaxOne’s VCP features cutting edge training tools and provides a single hub for all communication, scheduling, coaching, and collaboration. MaxOne is headquartered in Grand Rapids, MI, and they are proud to comprise a primarily remote team around the globe. 

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Grand Rapids, MI

For additional information, visit maxone.ai

KickID and MaxOne Partner on Launch of New KickID Academy

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Other, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

MaxOne on August, 24 2020

KickID and MaxOne

KickID, maker of the leading digital performance evaluation tool for youth soccer players has partnered with Virtual Coaching Platform (‘VCP’) provider MaxOne on the recent launch of their KickID Academy. MaxOne’s industry-leading white-labeled capabilities have allowed KickID to provide comprehensive virtual training solutions in their fully remote Academy program with their own branded app. The KickID suite of products is fully available in Europe and is preparing for its launch in the US in the Fall of 2020. 

While KickID’s flagship app was built to help individual soccer players comprehensively rate their skill with a single score, the partnership with MaxOne extends their value beyond player performance assessment and benchmarking. “MaxOne’s white-labeled integration was a clear choice for adding the broadest possible virtual training capabilities to KickID Academy,” said Hischam Telib, CEO of KickID. Coaches and players can now connect remotely to build training, workout, and skill development regimens that target specific areas of improvement identified through the existing Kick ID assessment tool. “This partnership allows us to support the full spectrum of player development by accurately tracking progress over time,” said Telib. 

Jason Mejeur, CEO of MaxOne, noted that creating successful virtual sports programs goes beyond great training resources. “For us, it’s about fostering community, accountability, and growth for teams by making long-distance interactions as meaningful and impactful as possible. We’ve built in-app messaging, leaderboards, and other communication tools to help players and coaches stay connected from anywhere.” 

For MaxOne, partnership with KickID provides exposure to new markets internationally and specifically within the sport of soccer, which remains the most popular sport worldwide. KickID has grown quickly since it was founded in 2016, with over 100,000 players having used the data-based assessment tool. This growth is anticipated to continue as industry research shows significantly increased adoption of virtual coaching and training tools among youth sports program organizers. 

To Learn More about KickID please visit:  //kickid.com/

To learn more about a white-labeled VCP for your organization go to:  /custom-sports-coaching-and-training-apps/  

About KickID

KickID is a Berlin-based company that provides technology to help amateur soccer players evaluate and improve their skills with a single proprietary score. The KickID player rating system is unique in the sports technology market and aims to revolutionize how talent is graded, identified, and developed internationally. With a dynamic and innovative team consisting of sports scientists, coaches, and data analysts, KickID is dedicated to leaving it all out on the pitch, and on the field. 

About MaxOne

MaxOne’s Virtual Coaching Platform (‘VCP’) empowers organizations, trainers, coaches, and athletes with a digital solution to train, connect, and grow together, anywhere. With an increasing list of demands, directors and coaches need to be smarter in the development of their training programs and in the use of their time and resources. MaxOne’s VCP features cutting edge training tools and provides a single hub for all communication, scheduling, coaching, and collaboration. MaxOne is headquartered in Grand Rapids, MI, and they are proud to comprise a primarily remote team around the globe.

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Grand Rapids, MI

For additional information, visit maxone.ai

The Art of Coaching Volleyball and MaxOne Partner to Launch Premier Mobile Training App for Coaches and Players

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Other, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

MaxOne on August, 19 2020

The Art of Coaching Volleyball and MaxOne

The Art of Coaching Volleyball (AOC), a leading provider of volleyball coaching resources and instructional clinics, has partnered with MaxOne on a branded integration of the MaxOne Virtual Coaching Platform (‘VCP’) that is now available directly to volleyball coaches and players nationwide.  The AOC VB Team App effectively delivers their expert content through a robust platform featuring on-demand access to virtual tools for communication, scheduling and building customized training programs. 

AOC’s new relationship with MaxOne combines the strengths of two industry-leading organizations to produce the most comprehensive and technologically advanced coaching app in the sport of volleyball. “We can now offer content from top coaches and athletes on a platform that is optimized for communication and engagement,” said Mark Tilson, President of The Art of Coaching. “In turn, coaches can easily schedule practices and manage training programs while sending workouts, drills, and content directly to players – from anywhere.” 

According to MaxOne CEO Jason Mejeur, “from within the app, players can see drill history, receive direct coaching feedback, monitor leaderboard information and chat with other players, helping them connect and grow as a team while training remotely. The app gives athletes meaningful, tangible ways to apply coaching by allowing them to measure their performance and improvement on specific skill sets.” 

“We’ve seen AOC as a great partner for some time, and our recent collaboration was driven by the reality that while volleyball training was traditionally done as a team, individual athlete training is increasingly prevalent,” said Mejeur. “We see this integration as a smart, proactive response to changes affecting all youth sports programs.” 

The AOC VB app has been available since June, 2020, with subscribers growing by 200% each month. An uptick in new users is expected in the fall as club volleyball begins and organizers set budgets and programming schedules.  

To learn more about the Art of Coaching Team App go to:

//www.theartofcoachingvolleyball.com/aocvb-team-app/

To learn more about a white-labeled VCP for your organization go to:  /custom-sports-coaching-and-training-apps/  

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About The Art of Coaching Volleyball

Founded in 2011 by coaches Terry Liskevych, Russ Rose and John Dunning, The Art of Coaching provides coaches with the tools they need to improve their players and teams. AOC offers comprehensive beginner-to-elite coaching education at annual clinics as well as extensive online instruction through coaching videos, certification courses, pre-made practice plans, worksheets and blog articles. For more information, visit www.theartofcoachingvolleyball.com and www.theartofcoachingsoftball.com.

About MaxOne

MaxOne’s Virtual Coaching Platform (‘VCP’) empowers organizations, trainers, coaches, and athletes with a digital solution to train, connect, and grow together, anywhere. With an increasing list of demands, directors and coaches need to be smarter in the development of their training programs and in the use of their time and resources. MaxOne’s VCP features cutting edge training tools, and provides a single hub for all communication, scheduling, coaching and collaboration. MaxOne is headquartered in Grand Rapids, MI, and they are proud to comprise a primarily remote team around the globe. 

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Grand Rapids, MI

For additional information, visit maxone.ai

Upward Sports uses white labeled MaxOne to move toward virtual enhancements in sports ministry experiences

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Other, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

MaxOne on July 31, 2020

Upward Sports and MaxOne

MaxOne and Upward Sports have partnered on a service offering that combines MaxOne’s Virtual Coaching Platform (‘VCP’) and its best-in-class training solution with Upward’s extensive youth sports network. This collaboration will allow Upward partners to effectively administer virtual youth sports camps across the country this summer.

Under the new arrangement, Upward will white label MaxOne’s technology and make the platform available to their partners’ volunteer coaches and players. Upward Sports, a non-profit organization, partners with churches to provide the foundation for running youth sports experiences like leagues, clinics, and seasonal camps. “We admire and align with Upward’s mission to positively impact communities through youth sports,” said MaxOne CEO, Jason Mejeur.

Upward chose to partner with MaxOne over developing a technology platform themselves, which had been previously considered. “With MaxOne, we saw an opportunity to quickly move toward providing the best, safest option for virtual sports programming,” said Upward’s Director of Operations, Nathan Holm. “To successfully run our sports experiences, we needed a platform that could handle tens of thousands of players and be intuitive enough for coaches of all experience levels to use. MaxOne had that solution in place.”

Because the future impact of COVID-19 on youth sports remains uncertain, this partnership further prepares Upward and their partners to adapt as needed for future impacts and remain highly involved with their participants, which is central to the mission. “With a full suite of coaching, training, and communication tools in place, Upward can now focus on the continuity, quality, and community impact of virtual programming,” said Holm.

“This relationship demonstrates the versatility of our virtual coaching platform for a wide array of partners in the youth sports market,” said Mejeur. “White labeling our platform as a branded, customized part of their offering increases the value they provide to players. This helps build their brand awareness, credibility, and long-term loyalty.”

About MaxOne

MaxOne’s Virtual Coaching Platform (‘VCP’) empowers organizations, trainers, coaches, and athletes with a digital solution to train, connect, and grow together, anywhere. With an increasing list of demands, directors and coaches need to be smarter in the development of their training programs and in the use of their time and resources. MaxOne’s VCP  features cutting edge training tools and provides a single hub for all communication, scheduling, coaching, and collaboration. Although MaxOne is headquartered in Grand Rapids, MI, they are proud to comprise a primarily remote team around the globe.

About Upward Sports

Based in South Carolina, Upward Sports is a non-profit organization helping local churches positively impact their communities through youth sports. Upward provides strategic consulting in creating a comprehensive sports solution that includes, training materials, logistic and ministry resources, apparel, and a suite of virtual tools. The organization’s network expands nationwide to more than 1,500 churches reaching over 300,000 children annually. Upward focuses on being a trusted partner, bringing “proven and innovative solutions to create transformational sports experiences.”

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Grand Rapids, MI

To learn more about a white-labeled VCP for your organization go to:  /custom-sports-coaching-and-training-apps/

How Virtual Coaching Platforms (‘VCP’) Help Youth Sports Adapt to COVID-19

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Other, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

MaxOne on June 30, 2020

LeaugeApps, a leading provider of youth sports management software solutions, recently published a survey of over 300 youth sports organizers. This comprehensive study reveals how organizers are adapting to the effects of COVID-19 by using digital tools for training, practices, coaching and community building. However, lingering concerns about player health and program effectiveness persist for many organizers and parents. This article will examine the top issues facing youth sports organizers and show how, with the right technology, these issues can be overcome to build a thriving organization.

How is COVID-19 Affecting Youth Sports Programs?

To understand how COVID-19 has changed the marketing, operation and administration of youth sports programs, it’s critical to first assess the current environment. The LeagueApps study includes nation-wide data from a wide variety of sports programs. Also included in the report is polling data from parents with children that are actively involved in sports programs. Altogether, this data provides clear indicators for how sports programs should change their operations, and the primary concerns among parents and players about program continuation.  

Key findings of the report include the following:

  • COVID-19 has accelerated trends in youth sports that were growing in popularity before the pandemic.
    • These trends include the adoption of digital applications frequently used by businesses (e.g. Zoom, Google Hangout), social media and virtual coaching platforms. 
  • Responding quickly and appropriately will determine whether organizations successfully navigate the “new normal.” 
    • Effective responses must include plans for remaining financially viable, ensuring players stay engaged and assuring parents about player safety. 54% of parents are unsure that their children’s sports programs will survive the pandemic effects.

Youth Sports Organizers are Using Virtual Meeting Tools to Adapt

60% of organizers surveyed said that they plan to use downtime during COVID-19 to focus on rebuilding their systems, processes and technology infrastructure. For most respondents, “technology infrastructure” means deploying some kind of virtual training and coaching capabilities.

In fact, the usage of virtual meeting technology was prevalent among almost all survey respondents, regardless of the program sport. Despite rapid adoption, the effectiveness of these new tools and their attractiveness to players varies significantly depending on the application(s) chosen.

A substantial majority of organizers are using virtual meeting tools or social media as interim virtual coaching solutions:

  • 50% of respondents are using Zoom or a similar business-focused webinar and meeting tools.
  • 25% of respondents are using common social media applications like Instagram.

How Effective are Virtual Meeting Tools for Youth Sports Programs?

While these tools have served sports programs as a temporary workaround, they will ultimately not provide the comprehensive solutions required for effective virtual coaching.

1 | They are insufficient as standalone communication platforms:

  • Many users have reported experiencing significant emotional and physical drain after using programs like Zoom; this is commonly called “Zoom fatigue”. While it can offer simple real-time 2-way communication, Zoom’s potentially negative side-effects can be mitigated by combining it with a virtual coaching platform (discussed below).
  • Popular social media applications like Instagram and Facebook have many features that make them distracting while in use. These applications are specifically designed to keep users preoccupied with notifications, news feeds and advertisements.  

2 | They are not built for virtual sports coaching:

  • Business-focused meeting tools like Zoom don’t facilitate team building opportunities like leaderboards, progress tracking and much more.
  • Many online meeting tools also lack any communication capabilities outside of when the meeting is currently in session. Effective, multi-channel (i.e. text and email) messaging is a key component of any successful virtual coaching program. 
  • Social media applications and webinar programs are not designed for distance athletic training (e.g. building virtual workout programs, drills and exercise routines). 

3 | They don’t support sustainable program growth:

  • Social media programs and tools like Zoom do not facilitate additional revenue generation for sports programs.
  • Additionally, online meeting tools do not provide an opportunity for sports programs to truly build their brand through whitelabeling capabilities, etc.

Top COVID-19 Concerns for Youth Sports Organizers and Parents

According to the LeaugueApps survey respondents, the primary impacts of COVID-19 specifically on youth sports are: 

  • Cancellation or delay of Fall sports programs
  • Generating interest in reformatted programs
  • Social distancing requirements that restrict safely conducting in-person practices
  • Parental concerns about player health and program continuation

So, how can youth sports organizers effectively and meaningfully respond to the challenges posed by technology constraints, COVID-19 restrictions and genuine concerns about player safety and program continuation?

The Benefits of Virtual Coaching Platforms

The alternatives to online meeting tools and social media applications are modern virtual coaching platforms (VCPs) designed specifically to facilitate remote communication, athlete training and team building.

Comprehensive and customizable VCPs like MaxOne provide organisers the ability to assure players and parents that their program can offer safe, compliant, highly effective and engaging experiences. 

MaxOne’s VCP was built for the challenges facing youth sports programs by offering advantages like the following:

  • Fight fatigue by combining Zoom with customizable training programs that allow players to proceed at their own pace – taking breaks as necessary to retain their focus and concentration.
  • Create additional revenue streams to support long-term financial health of the organization.
  • Mitigate the risk of future organization impacts due to COVID recurrence.
  • Differentiate program offerings with the most powerful virtual training experience available: 
    • On-demand training
    • Progress tracking over time
    • Compete on live leaderboards
    • Customizable training programs for individual athletes
    • AI-powered performance assessments

With an industry-leading VCP, organizers and coaches can offer players and parents innovative technology solutions that supplement in-person training and coaching. Benefits of this technology extend beyond a temporary fix for sports programs, including: 

  1. Increased player engagement
  2. Helping students develop self-discipline with practice schedules
  3. Greater coaching effectiveness on specific workout programs/techniques

Get started with a Virtual Coaching Platform Today

Regardless of how COVID-19 continues to impact youth sports, new research clearly shows that forward thinking organizers are focused on becoming more flexible, ensuring operational continuity and providing the most value possible to players and parents.

Experience the power of MaxOne’s Virtual Coaching Platform, and book a call today.

If you have questions please email info@gomaxone.com so a member from our team can assist you!

June 2020 Release Notes

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Other, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

MaxOne on June 8, 2020

Over the past month, we have pushed several new and exciting product enhancements out the door. Today, we want to highlight a few significant updates that will drastically improve the customer experience. Plan on seeing many more updates and new features in the coming weeks.

What’s New?

Workout Builder Complete Redesign

The MaxOne workout builder has been significantly enhanced to improve user-friendliness and decrease the time it takes coaches to create workouts. 

This includes a seamless drag-and-drop editor that allows users to place the exercises they want directly into the workout. Use filters to organize exercises and drills by their prospective training library (skill, strength, education) and customize sets and reps just as you could in the previous version, but this time with a fresh new design leading to increased efficiency for our coaches to get their workouts created faster than ever.

Add Descriptions when Building a Workout

Users now have the ability to add descriptions that will only affect the specific exercise in a workout without changing the description of the drill in the general training library.

For example, if a coach wants their athletes to complete their first rep of bench press at half speed to serve as a warm-up they can now address this by adding a description. When editing the sets and reps of a drill, simply click ‘Edit Description’ to add information with your specific coaching points. This will allow you to provide special notes on drills that are specific to the current workout you’re building.

 

Workout “Program Builder” Complete Redesign

In addition to enhancing the individual MaxOne workout builder, we’ve also improved the program builder feature. We have kept the same drag-and-drop style to maintain user friendliness but have improved the workflow in creating a multi-week workout program. 

Now, when building a workout program, you will be dragging your workouts into specific days in a calendar format making it easier to visualize how you plan to assign this program to your athletes. You can then duplicate weeks to create large programs quicker than before.

Assign a Multi-Week Workout Program 

Inside the new program builder, coaches can now assign entire multi-week workout programs to their team in just a few clicks. 

In our previous design, coaches had to click each workout in a program in order to assign it to their team. Now, simply select the program, the start date and group of athletes to assign it to and the workout will auto populate the remaining days and weeks of the program. 

This will greatly decrease the time it takes to build and deliver full workout programs to your team as well as help you deliver specific programs to specific groups. 

Ready to try out some of these new features? Login now.

Otherwise, wait to hear from us next month with more improvements to the MaxOne platform! In the meantime, if you have questions please email info@gomaxone.com so a member from our support team can assist you!

15 Coaching Tips to Make Next Season More Successful

By | Basketball, Coaches Resources

This article was originally posted by Don Kelbick on Breakthrough Basketball. As basketball season wraps up and the offseason begins, it is important to start preparing early for next season. This article lists 15 surefire coaching tips to make next season more successful than ever. 

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15 Coaching Tips

The season is winding down. Routines change, friendships have grown, priorities change. As a coach, what should you do now? When practice time comes and there is no practice, what do you do? When there are no games to prepare for, what do you do with your time?

Coaching is an all encompassing job. It takes time, devotion, and is very crisis oriented. To do it well, you have to plan your year, just as you have to plan your practices. Those outside the profession don’t understand it. Don’t try to explain it to them or expect them to understand. Coaches are a special breed.

Here are a just a few thoughts as to how to recover and prepare for the next season.

1 – 2 weeks post season

  1. Relax – After every season, there are decisions to be made. Whether they are career, personnel, or personal, immediately after the season is not the time to do it. Take some time for yourself, catch up with family and friends and try to settle back to a traditional lifestyle. Let your mind and body rest.
  2. Organize – collect all of your practice plans, put all your game films in order, and collate your statistics.
  3. Make the most of extraordinary clarity that you have after the season — If you’re like most coaches, you’ll have some amazing clarity a few days or weeks after the season is over. It’s very important to document what you’ve learned while it’s still fresh in your mind. You’ll find that this tip alone can have an enormous impact on your team’s improvements next year. You never think it will happen, but it’s amazing how much you forget during the off season. And you’ll be just as amazed how much documenting these thoughts will help you. Document what you’ve learned. Document what you should do different next year. Get those thoughts and ideas down so you can reference them next year.
  4. Be sure your players have their priorities straight. Players often let their schoolwork slip after the season. Be sure they are caught up and on time with their classes.

 

3 – 4 weeks post season

  1. Begin your evaluation process. Interpret your stats and decide what you feel is important and what you can affect by coaching. Start watching your game films and evaluate what you did well and what you did poorly. Evaluate your practice plans and determine what type of practice flow was most effective. Be sure to include your assistants in this process. Different points of view can be very helpful.
  2. Meet with your players. Discuss their thoughts of the season. What do they feel the team did well, what was done poorly? What do they feel they did well personally and what they need to work on? Discuss your feelings in regard to their performance. Talk about expectations for the next season.
  3. Develop an off-season development program. Rules differ from state to state in regard to what coaches can do in the off season. Many coaches also have other responsibilities (teaching, other sports, etc.) so the program should be simple and self moderating, the players should be able to get through it themselves. At least the first half of the off season should be spent on development as opposed to playing. In addition, if you wish to have your team strength train, maximum gains should be achieved during the first 75% of the off season.

 

A month after the season you are essentially in the off season. Use this period to recharge.

  1. If you can work with your players on skills, do so.
  2. Start to improve your team’s shooting percentage. In order for you to have a great team of shooters, you must get started right about now. The off season is the time to fix mechanics, start implementing player development programs, and give your players instructions on how to develop their shot. Great shooters become great in the off season.
  3. Sharpen the stone. In other words, continue to develop your knowledge and personal development. Never stop learning. Read books, attend clinics, talk to other coaches, and gather ideas for the next season.
  4. Shore up your coaching weaknesses by exploring other philosophies and teaching techniques. Expand your strengths by exploring additional areas that you can apply what you do well.

 

The summer months are a great time of the year for coaches. This is the time you begin thinking about next season.

  1. Experiment in summer league with new ideas. Decide what you can live with and what you can’t. Try new offenses and defenses.
  2. Evaluate how your team has improved and how the players have worked on their game. Let them play different positions, allow them to experiment and expand their game.
  3. The summer workout program should be about 50% skills – 50% play. Don’t overload your team with summer league games. Don’t worry, they will get enough play. On the whole, players don’t do enough skill work.

 

Once school starts again, you have entered the pre-season.

  1. Put together your playbook. Decide what offenses and defense you think you can succeed with.
  2. Build a master practice schedule when are you going to install each aspect of your program. Establish your teaching progressions.
  3. Start your preseason program. Work should be about 25% skills, 75% play. Change your strength training program to one of endurance and maintenance.
  4. Be sure that your players are doing their best in school. They should use this period to try to get ahead.

 

2 weeks before the season — Start to taper off of your workouts.

1 week before the season — Everybody takes off. Do some things with your family and friends. It might be months before you get to do it again.

Link to Original Article

Additional Resources

Want to learn more about MaxOne? Schedule a free demo HERE! 

Interested in Writing for MaxOne? Email Luke@gomaxone.com to see how you can get started!

Coach, You Make the Difference: Coaching Yourself First

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Uncategorized, Volleyball, Wrestling

This article was written by Mark Maguire who is the President of Castle Hill Knights Baseball Club. The article was posted on CoachUp, a great resource for finding a coach for personalized training. This article gives insight on how coaches can improve their mentality to better themselves and their program.

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Coaching Yourself First

Everyone loves to win. Though some can deal with losses better than others, I think it’s fair to say the obvious—nobody loves to lose. I have never seen a team of athletes, whether young or old (coaches and parents included), NOT jump for joy and celebrate with gusto from winning a game after a long stretch of losing. Winning tastes better after losing.

Coaches have a default system built nicely into their DNA—and that is to win.

No, coach, you’re not a bad person for wanting to win; you’re not a bad person for wanting all the right ingredients given to you to help you win; you’re not a bad person to even expect the support from your club so you can lead your team to win. And you know what would make winning even better—if all the players and parents who are involved in your team like you and said awesome things about you. Everyone would sleep well and there wouldn’t be any issues to deal with. Yes, winning… and when everyone’s a winner… that can’t help but taste good.

But let’s get back to the default system built into you that wants to win and to tackle a season that you already perceive will be full of downsides, frustration and losses. (If you’re an awesome coach with an awesome team with an awesome plan, you maybe wasting your time reading any further).

There is something you probably already know and probably don’t need reminding but I’m going to say it anyway: don’t focus on winning.

Winning is a result, an outcome. It’s similar to the fact that when you focus on wanting to be loved and you try everything in your power for others to love you, the outcome is the person or group you want to love you, is turned off by you.

In every aspect of life we all must let go of the outcomes; they are too far away and hinder us from working on the one thing we have control over—ourselves.

Coaching Yourself First

Whatever group of athletes you’re working with this season, you’re teaching individuals techniques and skills to add to their repertoire so they’ll not only be better players but they’ll also contribute to the team better.  You’re working on the here and now and what is in front of you. The outcome will take care of itself. And if the weekly outcome of the individual or the team is not what you hoped for, then you evaluate what has happened and keep working on the skills, techniques or even the respect for the game that you’re aiming for.

Coach, you make the difference.

But now, here is the big thing, and I hope you are sitting down and not going to skim through this paragraph.

The first and foremost person you’re coaching and are responsible for is YOU.

I see it all the time when coaches (also parents and players) are complaining about what’s wrong, blaming others for their frustrations, and making excuses for why their situation is dire.

Coach, if you want to have any chance, you must STOP all these negative behaviours. These only reveal your own insecurities and fears about the outcomes of your team and yourself. You have lost focus on your own personal growth and what you’re learning and correcting about yourself.

I’ll say it again, the one and only thing you can control is yourself: your reactions, your mindset, your attitude!

If you’re prone to complaining, excuse making or blaming others, it doesn’t create a good mix if you’re prone to wanting to win. Unfortunately, very few make the effort to show self-control to stop these traits.

There is no fancy formula here to speaking and acting differently. Self control is the key. Start with stopping  to think about what you’re about to say. If a complaint, excuse, or a finger-pointing blame is about to slip out of your mouth—STOP! Say nothing. Only say something if it is constructive, or encouraging, or helpful.

Breathe deeply and refocus on how you need to act or react to your current situation.

The default for any coach who is having a tough time (real or imaginary) is to try anything and possibly sacrifice anything to muster up a win.

Don’t, however, sacrifice the overall good you want to create by teaching higher values of the game and having higher expectations of your young athletes. Eventually, you will be known to have made a positive difference and that difference will last a lifetime for those fine human beings entrusted in your care.

Coach, you make the difference!

 

The Process of Leadership

By | Baseball, Basketball, Coaches Resources, Football, Hockey, Lacrosse, Soccer, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling

 

 

This article was originally posted  by Dr. Cory Dobbs, on Football Toolbox. Dobbs is a national expert on sport leadership and team building and is the founder of The Academy for Sport Leadership.  A teacher, speaker, consultant, and writer, Dr. Dobbs has worked with professional, collegiate, and high school athletes and coaches teaching leadership as a part of the sports experience. In this article he talks about the two distinct difference between two dominant leadership styles, drivers and builders. 

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Drivers Vs. Builders

We often talk about a leader having a “style” of leadership, a distinctive way of thinking, feeling, and acting.  And it is true; coaches do have a style that shapes who they are and what they do.  The relationship between style and leadership is expressed as a systematic process in how a coach gets things done and inspires his or her players to be their very best.

Over the past decade I have watched many coaches in action and have detected a distinct difference between two dominant leadership styles.  There are many ways to describe the leadership habits of coaches, but it appears to me that as leaders most fall into one of two categories—drivers or builders.   Drivers tend to be what leadership experts refer to as transactional leaders while builders fall pretty naturally into the category of transformational leaders. Drivers and builders have two very different leadership mindsets and skill sets.

Drivers are generally after impressive achievements, especially the attainment of fame, status, popularity, or power.  Not that there is anything wrong with that, as Jerry Seinfeld would say.  Drivers view success to be mastery of the technical and tactical aspects of their sport. Builders commit to their calling and enjoy the human development side of coaching.  For them, significance is found in contributing to the lives of their players.  It’s not that they don’t want to win; it’s simply that winning includes building self-confident people who will succeed away from the playing field.

Coaching is a major factor in any team’s success.  Most players recognize this.  They’ve been coached since they were tots playing in youth leagues.  And for the most part they’ve believed in and trusted their coaches to teach them to play the game while instilling life skills and personal values.  However, many adults reveal years later that they learned little from coaches they encountered in their student-athletic experience.  Generally, the coaches that fail to have a long-term impact on student-athletes are transactional leaders.  Many former student-athletes view their experience as being a pawn in the game of student-athletics.

Transformational leaders (builders) do more with and for their student-athletes than transactional leaders (drivers).  These leaders tend to empower student-athletes with challenge and persuasion and actively engage in supporting and mentoring the holistic development of their players.  Transformational leaders seek to inspire their followers to commit to a shared vision of how student-athletics can enhance their lives.  For the transformational leader the sport situation offers an opportunity for the participant to learn such life skills as perseverance, character development, relationship building, and goal attainment.

Transactional leaders, on the other hand, are those that prefer to set up simple interactional exchanges or agreements with their followers, often investing little in building relationships.  They manage players through the use of carrots and sticks—offering a reward (usually playing time) for a desired behavior.  These leaders are those that often use the maxim “the bench is my best teacher.”

This is a prime example of contingent reinforcement—you do “X” and I’ll give you “Y.”  A transformational leader, while certainly not shy to use the bench as a learning tool, would not view the bench as a teacher—that’s a role they cherish.  The transactional coach keeps his or her distance from the athlete, preferring to have a “distant” relationship.  Some coaches will fake the relational process, but the lack of authenticity is quickly recognized by the student-athlete.  The transformational coach is more likely to spend time building relationships with players and showing them he or she cares.  Their mindset is that people aren’t going to care about you and your concerns unless they know you care about theirs.

Transformational leaders don’t do this just to be nice, they understand it to be an effective and appropriate way to deal with young and developing student-athletes.  Building relations is not a road block to success as many coaches find that because they show they care about the person, they can ask for and demand more performance.  Think about it.  Are you more likely to extend yourself for someone you care about or someone you don’t like and care for?

Coaches do many things.  They inspire and motivate, they teach and instruct, and they set an example.  More than anything else, however, coaches help the student-athletes make sense of some of life’s most important lessons.

Over time many coaches move from a driver dominated way of coaching to that of a builder.  Take for example Westmont College men’s basketball coach John Moore.  “Coaching and teaching is more meaningful for me today than it was eight to ten years ago,” said Moore.  “It is more significant because of the kinds of things that are important in coaching.  Someone once said to me, ‘You don’t have a philosophy of coaching until you get to 15 years as a head coach.’ I discounted that originally, but there was a point for me, and it was in that 15-year range, that I realized that I had a philosophy of coaching – that makes it more meaningful for me and more meaningful for my players.”

Being a driver, a transactional leader, can be very effective in producing immediate results.  However, the constant pounding and intimidating of your student-athletes will reduce the motivation of most student-athletes.  Student-athletes prefer to be guided and seek motivation from the collaborative process of coaching.  Even the most self-motivated player will lose their drive if you don’t provide them with positive reinforcement and a sense of worth.

Transformational coaches appeal to players by working with the athletes to create a compelling and collective purpose; a purpose beyond individual ambition that enriches the possibilities of each team member.  By valuing both relationships and results, a builder’s influence leads to higher levels of trust, empowerment, and community.

For builders, the real definition of success is a life and work that brings personal fulfillment, lasting relationships, and makes a difference in the world in which they live.

Are You a Driver or a Builder?

Drivers  / Dominant Leadership Style: TransactionalBuilders / Dominant Leadership Style: Transformative
  • Put results first. Relationships are subordinate to results, a means to an end.
  • Put people first.  Relationships are priorities to producing results.
  • Make the decisions. Drivers like being decisive and in control.  Drivers set the agenda.
  • Stress team capabilities.  Builders want to build systems and talent.
  • Possess a controlling spirit.  They feel if they can control people, they’ll maintain absolute authority.
  • Get others involved.  Builders seek input from other coaches and value input from players.
  • Resort to more regulations.  Drivers use rules and regulations to enforce compliance.  Drivers want things done their way.
  • Let solutions emerge.  Builders don’t try to tackle every problem knowing that some problems solve themselves.
  • Crack the whip.  Drivers keep pressure on for accountability.  Come down hard when goals aren’t attained.
  • Take a long-term focus.  Builders assemble players, programs, and processes.
  • Take a short-term focus.  Drivers tend to focus on the day’s or week’s results.
  • Are mission driven. It’s the mission that sets the priorities.
  • Focus on “what” have you done for me lately? Enough said.
  • Are servant leaders. What’s my contribution?  Builders possess a mental model stimulated by a “What can I contribute to the lives of my players” approach to leading.
  • Get “in your face.”  Drivers thrive on confrontation.  “My way or the highway”.
  • Embrace empowerment. Builders work to prepare others for leadership roles.
  • Are more critical than positive.  Drivers find it difficult to accentuate the positive.
  • Support identity of team. No two teams will ever be the same.  Builders see value in the diversity of personalities.
  • Power trip.  Fear giving away power.  Empowering student-athletes to become team leaders is not a priority.
  • Vision is the main course, not an appetizer.  Builders weigh the costs of today’s decisions on  tomorrow.
  • Span of vision.  Concern is for results today regardless of costs tomorrow.

 

About the Author

Dr. Cory Dobbs is a national expert on sport leadership and team building and is the founder of The Academy for Sport Leadership.  A teacher, speaker, consultant, and writer, Dr. Dobbs has worked with professional, collegiate, and high school athletes and coaches teaching leadership as a part of the sports experience.  He facilitates workshops, seminars, and consults with a wide-range of professional organizations and teams.  Dr. Dobbs previously taught in the graduate colleges of business and education at Northern Arizona University, Sport Management and Leadership at Ohio University, and the Jerry Colangelo College of Sports Business at Grand Canyon University.

Link to original article: The Process of Leadership

Suggested Agenda’s for Offseason and Monthly Basketball Meetings

By | Basketball, Coaches Resources, Uncategorized

Getting ready for off season basketball meeting’s and wondering what type of agenda you should put together? This Article, originally posted by Basketball Breakthrough, highlights the keys to getting the most out of your offseason schedule and meetings. 

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Suggested Agenda’s for Offseason and Monthly Basketball Meetings

As a coach, you’ll find off season meetings to be extremely beneficial. It’s an opportunity to get problems out in the open and get all the coaches aligned. You’ll also find that regularly scheduled weekly and monthly meetings are invaluable. You’d be amazed by how much regular meetings will improve your program and communication. The meetings keep everyone on the same page, keep everyone accountable, solve problems, and help you run a better program.

The key is to have a good agenda, document “actions items” from the meetings, assign due dates, and hold everyone accountable.

You could even conduct daily coaching huddles (10 minutes max) to discuss priorities for the day, anything you’re stuck on, and relevant stats/metrics. This helps keep all coaches in sync and collectively working on the same goal.

In regards to an off season meeting agenda, here’s an agenda that works well for us:

  • Start with good news. Each coach shares some good news, both at coaching and personal level.
  • Review statistics and key metrics for the season and possibly past seasons.
  • Have each coach talk about… “What worked?” and “What didn’t work?”
  • Review goals for the program and core values. Each coach should provide stories of how the team accomplished goals and lived up to core values.
  • Discuss and set goals new goals for upcoming season.
  • Review and discuss a new master schedule.
  • Review the meeting schedule with your coaches. Did you have a meeting schedule? Can it be improved?
  • Brain storm top projects and problems that need solved. What or where are the recurring issues or concerns that the team is facing day in and day out? Use collective intelligence to solve ONE of the biggest issues. Get everyone’s input and drill into the issue.
  • Discuss what training tools and development would be beneficial for the coaches. What materials should coaches study and review during the off season?
  • Set priorities, tasks, and goals for each coach. Set deadlines and hold coaches accountable.
  • Review documentation. Do processes need documented?

This agenda is similar to what big businesses and corporations use in their meetings. It’s also similar to what’s taught in the Rockefeller Business Training program. These techniques work great for running a basketball program too!

During your meeting, be sure to document ALL the meeting notes, action items, and plans. Schedule the next meeting to review everyone’s progress and keep everyone moving in the same direction. You’ll find that these regular meetings make a tremendous impact on your program.

To your success!